Infliximab in Crohn (ACCENT I)

  Crohn

Infliximab in Crohn


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Maintenance infliximab for Crohn’s disease: the ACCENT I randomised trial

Hanauer SB, Feagan BG, Lichtenstein GR, Mayer LF, Schreiber S, Colombel JF, Rachmilewitz D, Wolf DC, Olson A, Bao W, Rutgeerts P; ACCENT I Study Group.

Background

We did a randomised controlled trial to assess the benefit of maintenance infliximab therapy in patients with active Crohn’s disease who respond to a single infusion of infliximab.

Methods

573 patients with a score of at least 220 on the Crohn’s disease activity index (CDAI) received a 5 mg/kg intravenous infusion of infliximab at week 0. After assessment of response at week 2, patients were randomly assigned repeat infusions of placebo at weeks 2 and 6 and then every 8 weeks thereafter until week 46 (group I), repeat infusions of 5 mg/kg infliximab at the same timepoints (group II), or 5 mg/kg infliximab at weeks 2 and 6 followed by 10 mg/kg (group III). The prespecified co-primary endpoints were the proportion of patients who responded at week 2 and were in remission (CDAI <150) at week 30 and the time to loss of response up to week 54 in patients who responded. Analyses of the co-primary endpoints were by intention to treat.

Findings

335 (58%) patients responded to a single infusion of infliximab within 2 weeks. At week 30, 23 of 110 (21%) group I patients were in remission, compared with 44 of 113 (39%) group II (p=0·003) and 50 of 112 (45%) group III (p=0·0002) patients. Thus, patients in groups II and III combined were more likely to sustain clinical remission than patients in group I (odds ratio 2·7, 95% Cl 1·6–4·6). Throughout the 54-week trial, the median time to loss of response was 38 weeks (IQR 15 to >54) and more than 54 weeks (21 to >54) for groups II and III, respectively, compared with 19 weeks (10–45) for group I (p=0·002 and p=0·0002, respectively). Infliximab safety was consistent with that seen in other trials of infliximab in Crohn’s disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In particular, the incidence of serious infections was similar across treatment groups.

Interpretation

Patients with Crohn’s disease who respond to an initial dose of infliximab are more likely to be in remission at weeks 30 and 54, to discontinue corticosteroids, and to maintain their response for a longer period of time, if infliximab treatment is maintained every 8 weeks.


Long-term outcome of treatment with infliximab in 614 patients with Crohn’s disease: results from a single-centre cohort

F Schnitzler, H Fidder, M Ferrante, M Noman, I Arijs, G Van Assche, I Hoffman, K Van Steen, S Vermeire, P Rutgeerts

Background and aims: This observational study assessed the long-term clinical benefit of infliximab (IFX) in 614 consecutive patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) from a single centre during a median follow-up of 55 months (interquartile range (IQR) 27-83).

Methods: The primary analysis looked at the proportion of patients with initial response to IFX who had sustained clinical benefit at the end of follow-up. The long-term effects of IFX on the course of CD as reflected by the rate of surgery and hospitalisations and need for corticosteroids were also analysed.

Results: 10.9% of patients were primary non-responders to IFX. Sustained benefit was observed in 347 of the 547 patients (63.4%) receiving long-term treatment. In 68.3% of these, treatment with IFX was ongoing and in 31.7% IFX was stopped, with the patient being in remission. Seventy patients (12.8%) had to stop IFX due to side effects and 118 (21.6%) due to loss of response. Although the yearly drop-out rates of IFX in patients with episodic (10.7%) and scheduled treatment (7.1%) were similar, the need for hospitalisations and surgery decreased less in the episodic than in the scheduled group. Steroid discontinuation also occurred in a higher proportion of patients in the scheduled group than in the episodic group.

Conclusions: In this large real-life cohort of patients with CD, long-term treatment with IFX was very efficacious to maintain improvement during a median follow-up of almost 5 years and changed disease outcome by decreasing the rate of hospitalisations and surgery.


References:

Hanauer SB, Feagan BG, Lichtenstein GR, et al. Maintenance infliximab for Crohn’s disease: the ACCENT I randomised trial. Lancet 2002;359:1541–9.

Schnitzler F, Fidder H, Ferrante M, et al. Long-term outcome of treatment with infliximab in 614 patients with Crohn’s disease: results from a single-centre cohort. Gut. 2009;58(4):492-500. doi:10.1136/gut.2008.155812

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